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Rahul Profile
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Re: The Amityville Horror.


quote:

JohnH wrote:

Down the street from here is where 90 died in a Cerritos plane crash....I drive home through there late at night from gigs, scary as all hell. All the homes are occupied also. That's sick.

John



People have probably died at some point or another, on almost every patch we live in. I bet someone has died in my house over the years, or on the land on which it was built.

So if the death is more publicised, does that make it more sick to live there? Or is it just better not to know who died on your patch?

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22/4/2005, 10:47 Link to this post Send Email to Rahul   Send PM to Rahul
 
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Re: The Amityville Horror.


quote:

JohnH wrote:

Hmmm...I tried to find evidence of the hoax on the net and all I found were sites that had experts saying it wasn't a hoax. So what's the deal here?




Amityville:
Horror or Hoax?
A Look at this Classic Case
by Troy Taylor

 I was barely a teenager when the sensational book by Jay Anson, “The Amityville Horror”, was released. I will never forget snatching up a copy from a local bookstore, only to read it and then re-read it again. Could such things really happen? Could ghosts destroy a family the way that evil spirits did George and Kathy Lutz? Could a ghost force someone to kill, as demonic entities caused Ronald DeFeo to murder his entire family?
 And most terrifying of all.... could the American public be so easily deceived into believing the events chronicled in the book were actually real? The answer to that question is a resounding “yes” as is proven by the fact that many people still believe in the veracity of “The Amityville Horror”, one of the greatest paranormal hoaxes of all time!
 But how did it all begin? How could we all be fooled so easily? And what events led up to the release of the book? To answer those inquiries, we have to go back to November 1974 and understand the true events that occurred in the house on Ocean Avenue.
 The horrific carnage that prefaced the story of the “Amityville Horror” began one dark fall night in 1974. The DeFeos, Ronald Sr. and Louise, their two young sons, Mark and John, and two daughters, Dawn and Allison, were sleeping peacefully in their comfortable, three-story, Dutch Colonial home in Amityville. The silence of the house was shattered when Ronald DeFeo murdered his parents and his siblings with a high-powered rifle. One by one, he killed each of them as they slept, although strangely, the sound of the gunshots never awakened the other family members.
 DeFeo blamed the massacre on the malevolent force of an evil spirit that was present in the house. He stated that the creature began speaking to him and controlled him while he committed the murders. Not surprisingly, he pleaded insanity at his trial. The prosecutor countered the plea by stating that DeFeo was not crazy at all, but merely trying to cash in on his parent’s substantial life insurance polices.
 Regardless, the jury ignored DeFeo’s claims and found him guilty of six counts of first-degree murder. State Supreme Court Justice Thomas M. Stark sentenced him to 150 years in prison.
 The tragedy in Amityville made grim local news but few outside of New York ever heard about the house until some time later. The horrendous events that followed began on December 18, 1975, when a young couple named George and Kathy Lutz bought the house on Ocean Avenue for $80,000. Just a week before Christmas, they moved into their new “dream home” with Kathy’s three children from a previous marriage. They would later claim that the “dream home” soon became a nightmare!
 Almost from the moment that they moved into the house, the Lutz family would insist they noticed an unearthly presence in the place. They began to hear mysterious noises that they could not account for. Locked windows and doors would inexplicably open and close, as if by invisible hands. George Lutz, a sturdy former Marine, claimed to be plagued by the sound of a phantom brass band that would march back and forth through the house. When a Catholic priest entered the house, after agreeing to exorcize it, an eerie, disembodied voice told him to “get out”.
After the aborted exorcism, the events began to intensify. The thumping and scratching sounds grew worse, a devilish creature was seen outside the windows at night, George Lutz was seemingly “possessed” by an evil spirit and green slime even oozed from the walls and ceiling. The family was further terrified by ghostly apparitions of hooded figures, clouds of flies that appeared from nowhere, cold chills, personality changes, sickly odors, objects moving about on their own, the repeated disconnection of their telephone service and communication between the youngest Lutz child and a devilish pig that she called “Jodie”. Kathy Lutz reported that she was often beaten and scratched by unseen hands and that one night, she was literally levitated up off the bed.
 The family managed to hold out for 28 days before they gathered up their possessions and fled from the house. According to their story, they left so quickly that they didn’t take their furniture or many of their other possessions with them. The demonic spirits, they said, had driven them from their home!
 In February 1976, not long after the Lutz family left the house, local residents were stunned to see New York Channel 5’s news team doing a life news feed from the house on Ocean Avenue. The news crew filmed a seance that was being conducted and a dramatic investigation of the place conducted by Ed and Lorraine Warren, two of America’ most famous “demonologists”. The Amityville house would soon become the center of a three-ring circus!
 For those not familiar with the Warrens, Lorraine claims to be a clairvoyant and a trance medium who is said to have the uncanny ability to contact the spirit world. On the other hand, her husband Ed, purports to be an expert on hauntings and exorcism. From the 1950’s through the 1980’s, the Warrens, who are based in Connecticut, were recognized as authorities when it came to ghosts and demons. While they are still active today, their methods have been replaced by more scientific standards of investigation. Regardless, in 1976, their stamp of approval on the events reported at Amityville caught the attention of a nation.
 The Warrens went to the house for the first time in February and while supposedly George Lutz refused to accompany them, he did loan them a key. The Warrens stated that they found old newspapers around the house and that the refrigerator was still stocked with food. It was obvious to them, they said, that the Lutz family had left in a hurry. The Warrens brought two other psychics with them to the house to conduct their seance. They later reported that they “sensed” an “unearthly presence” in the house and Ed Warren also claimed to experience heart palpitations that he blamed on the occult forces. The house was haunted, they said, by the angry spirits of Indians who had once inhabited the area and by “inhuman spirits”. The story was that the Shinnecock Indians had used that very parcel of land as a place where sick and insane members of the tribe were isolated until they died. They did not bury the dead there however because they supposedly believed the land was “infested with demons”.
 Not long after, the George and Kathy Lutz teamed up with a writer named Jay Anson and together, they authored what would become a best-selling book called “The Amityville Horror”. The book would then go on to spawn a bad movie and a number (of even worse sequels) and not surprisingly, the Warrens were hired by producer Dino de Laurentis and the production company to serve as consultants about the supernatural occurrences portrayed in the film. They also made the rounds of the talk show circuit, discussing the horrifying events in Amityville.
 The “Amityville Horror” grew from news reports and newspaper articles to books, magazines and television. The story would become internationally known and around the world, people recognized the name of Amityville. Most amazing was the fact that this terrifying story was absolutely true... or so it read in bold print on the cover of the phenomenally selling book. But not everyone was convinced, even in paranormal circles. In fact, a few of them smelled something bad in Amityville!
 One of those was a paranormal investigator from New York named Dr. Stephen Kaplan. George Lutz had approached him in early 1976 about conducting an investigation of the house on Ocean Avenue. At that time, Kaplan was the executive director of the Parapsychology Institute of America, based on Long Island. He received a phone call from Lutz on February 16 and wanted the society to investigate the house for supernatural activity. He asked about a fee for the group’s services and Kaplan told him that they did not charge for the investigation but that “if the story is a hoax...the public will know”. A few days later, Lutz called and cancelled the investigation. He claimed that he and his wife did not want any publicity about the house. This may have been why the Channel 5 news story came as such a surprise to Kaplan and his colleagues a few days later!
 As the story of the “Amityville Horror” was becoming an international sensation, Kaplan was at work collecting evidence and materials about the house and the claims made by the Lutz family, Jay Anson, the Warrens and the media. Although convinced of the validity of the paranormal and supernatural activity, Kaplan was not convinced of the truth behind the Amityville case. While it was possible that a haunting could have occurred at the house, especially in light of the violent events that had taken place there, there was something not quite right about the accounts of the Lutz’s. After some initial investigation, Kaplan became sure that a hoax was being perpetrated on the public and such a hoax could prove to be damaging for legitimate paranormal cases in the future. With that in mind, he became determined to show that the entire story was a farce.

(End Pt. 1)

 




Last edited by MrEd45, 22/4/2005, 17:09


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22/4/2005, 17:07 Link to this post Send Email to MrEd45   Send PM to MrEd45 Blog
 
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Re: The Amityville Horror.


(Pt. 2)

 Little did he know that he would face an uphill battle, not only against the Warrens, but against the general public as well. By this time, the Warrens had become too firmly entrenched to back out of the case. They continued to resolutely support the Lutz claims of the house being haunted, or possessed, by evil forces. They began their own campaign to try and discredit Stephen Kaplan, especially after his untimely death a number of years later. To this day, in spite of confessions and in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the Warrens still maintain that the house was haunted.
 The general public had been so force-fed the story by the media, that Kaplan’s evidence against the house being haunted seemed to fall on deaf ears. Thanks to the fact that the truth was not as glamorous or as dramatic as the original story, the new story was scarcely reported and was barely noticed at first. In fact, Kaplan’s diaries of the investigations were turned into a book that did not get published for many years after the events took place. The problem remained that the public loved the story and the house on Ocean Avenue became a Long Island landmark. People traveled from all over the country to drive past and stare at it. Tourists made it their first stop on Long Island and locals soon began calling the sightseers the “Amityville Horribles”. The trouble with curiosity seekers and complaints from locals were so bad in the late 1970’s that they drove one Amityville police chief into early retirement!
 Kaplan had discovered that the “Amityville Horror” was pure invention. In 1979, a lawyer named William Weber confessed to his part in the hoax during a paranormal radio show hosted by author Joel Martin. Weber had been the lawyer for convicted killer Ronald DeFeo and he admitted that he and George Lutz had concocted the story of the haunting over a few bottles of wine. Weber’s motive was to get a new trial for DeFeo, using a “Devil made him do it” defense. According to Weber, Lutz merely wanted to get out from under a mortgage that he couldn’t afford. His business was in trouble and he needed a scheme to bail him out.
 Kaplan found ample proof, outside of the glaring confession, that the story was a hoax. He gained access to the house on many occasions and found that the so-called “Red Room”, where the book claimed occult ceremonies took place, was nothing more than a small pipe well that gave access to them if they needed to be repaired. No “demonic face” had ever appeared on the bricks inside of the fireplace. He also noted that the original front door of the house (blown off its hinges in the book) was still in place and intact. In addition, he found a writer for the local newspaper that had also been suspicious of the story. After some searching, the columnist discovered that the Lutz’s had returned the day after “fleeing” from the house to hold a garage sale. He also charged that during their “28-day nightmare” that never once called the police for assistance, something that would have been commonly done under the circumstances. The list of things that did not happen in the house went on and on and to Kaplan (and to most everyone who listened to his rational arguments), the evidence for an “Amityville Hoax” was overwhelming.
 Jim and Barbara Cromarty, who later moved into the house, also maintained that it was not haunted. Because of the problems they had experienced with the curiosity-seekers, they sued the hardcover and paperback publishers of the “Amityville Horror”, as well as Jay Anson and George and Kathy Lutz. They stated that the entire case had been a put-on from the beginning and it had “blighted their lives”. The suit was later settled with the new occupants for an undisclosed amount.
 This, along with the publication of “The Amityville Horror Conspiracy” by Stephen Kaplan, should have put an end to the case, but it did not. In fact, more than two decades later, people still often question the facts behind the case and the real events that may, or may not, have occurred in Amityville. Today, most researchers concede that the story was mostly, if not entirely, fabricated. To the general public though, the truth remains much more of a shadowy thing and some theorists who believe that there are still things about the story that do not add up will point to a string of tragedies that surround the case.
 

- Paul Hoffman, the writer who penned the original story for newspapers and for “Good Housekeeping” magazine, died a few years after the story broke under mysterious circumstances.
- Jay Anson, author of the best-selling book, made a fortune from the story but died shortly after he received his first million dollar advance for his next book. That book, an occult novel entitled “666“, was a failure.
- Demonologist Ed Warren, suffered a heart attack a few years after his initial investigations of Amityville. He maintained the illness was caused by the house.
- David Cromarty, the son of the house’s new owners, died an early, tragic death. He used the bedroom that had once belonged to Ronald DeFeo for several years.
- Dr. Stephen Kaplan, who took on the hoaxers, almost died from a major heart attack in 1976 and then passed away several years later. His death was untimely and cut short a distinguished career. He would not live to see his book on the case published.
 Some would say that the house “got them” but others would admit that these events are nothing more than strange coincidences that have been arranged to look like something they most likely are not. To this author, they are a perfect example of this entire case as a whole... a blending of fact with fiction in an attempt to titillate and terrify the American public.

Sources:
The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson (1977)
The Amityville Horror Conspiracy by Dr. Stephen Kaplan (1995)
ESP, Hauntings and Poltergeists by Loyd Auerbach (1986)
The Encyclopedia of Ghosts and Spirits by Rosemary Ellen Guiley (2000)
True Tales of the Unknown: Beyond Reality by Sharon Jarvis (1991)
The Encyclopedia of Ghosts by Daniel Cohen (1984)

 (C) Copyright 2001 by Troy Taylor. All Rights Reserved.


...and that's just the first link I found John...many, many more if you'd like to have the text 'cut 'n pasted' here or the links provided...just enter "Amityville horror - hoax" in a search engine and I'm sure you can get the 'other' side of the story.emoticon

Last edited by MrEd45, 22/4/2005, 17:11


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" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
22/4/2005, 17:09 Link to this post Send Email to MrEd45   Send PM to MrEd45 Blog
 
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Re: The Amityville Horror.


The most famous haunting of all time

 The Amityville Horror.

 The Amityville Horror story has shocked many teenagers over the years, and quite a few adults too. The story tells of an innocent young couple and their children who move into a comfortable new home in Amityville, USA. They are soon mysteriously plagued by what they consider to be demons, poltergeists and ghosts, all of which they consider to have somehow come from some brutal murders that took place in the house just before they moved in.
You can buy the book and the DVD of the story at Amazon.com - just click below to order
 The story of the Amityville house was generally considered one of the best known hoaxes. But who knows -did something really ever happen to the Lutzes to make them tell these stories?. It's not for me to say. All I can do is put down all the information that I've collected on the haunting.

MAKE UP YOUR OWN MIND
I have received plenty of comments about this particular page - I personally belive that the entire thing is a hoax. Why? you ask. Well if you stand well back and take a good long look at the entire story the one thing that sticks out like a sore thumb is this one simple word MONEY. I think that alone should explain the truth behind the entire story.
 The owners of the house were George and Kathy Lutz. They moved into the house at Amityville after its previous owners the DeFeo's were murdered by their son, Ronald DeFeo. The Lutzes claimed that the evil that was present in the house drove Ronald to murder his entire family.
 What happened was that in the early hours of the morning on November 13th, 1974. Ronald took a high powered rifle and murdered his mother, father, two brothers, and two sisters. Apparently one of his sisters awoke during the shooting only to be looking down the barrel of the shotgun and be shot dead.
 Ronald DeFeo's excuses for murdering his family changed consistently, from him hearing voices to him not hearing voices to it being a Mafia hit to the older of his sisters.
 After being arrested Ronald kept boasting how he would plead insanity at the court hearing and be released in a few years. Psychiatrists found that he was suffering an antisocial personality disorder, however Ronald was found sane and responsible for his actions. Everyone was shocked when they heard that DeFeo had a list of people who he was going to take revenge on after his release. It was also noted that DeFeo kept asking about his inheritance from his murdered family and how much he'd be getting from this fact it can generally be assumed that he killed his parents and family for the money he was hoping to receive from their insurance. A sad case but not the sort of thing that would cause demons to possess a house.
 Ronald DeFeo was sentenced to six consecutive 25 year-to-life prison terms, he still rots in prison to this day.
 The Lutzes moved in to the house in the summer of 1975. They knew about the murders but decided that it wouldn't be a problem for them and their three children. Little did they know. After living in the house for 10 days the Lutzes suddenly abandoned all their possessions and moved out of their beloved new home. They soon went public and told of horrors that went on in their house that tormented them whilst living there.
 The stories they told included a demonic levitating pig, glowing red eyes that stared at them through the window, ghostly voices that tell them to "get out!",a pit into hell in the basement, oozing slime and blood from the walls, urges to repeat the murders that had happened in the house previously, infestations of flies, and waking up every night at the exact same time that the murders took place. Now I don't know about you - but having investigated quite a few real-life hauntings myself I know for a fact these things simply don't happen, the only places they seem to happen are in the minds of those who wish these things to happen for publicity and money and also in the minds of those who have seen The Exorcist and other horror films one too many times.
 A book by Jay Anson was written in 1977 titled "The Amityville Horror - A True Story".It was such a good story that the public and media took to it instantly. The book was an instant best seller.
 The Film The Amityville Horror was released in 1979, it was also an instant hit. The Amityville Horror story was now famous around the world.
 By now some discrepancies were showing. The Lutzes had changed their story a few times, it became more elaborate and they told of more and more happenings whilst living in the house. The Lutzes also changed the amount of time that they'd spent there from 10 to 28 days.
 What the media and public failed to notice at the peak of the Amityville house's popularity was that actual professional investigators had been through the house and found nothing unusual or significant about the house. One of those investigators was Dr. Stephen Kaplan. He was the first to come out with the news that the Lutzes story was a hoax.
 Other professional investigators noticed by accident that the Lutzes were holding contracts for book and movie deals. Everyone became suspicious of the Lutzes and their horror stories.
 Another family moved in to the house. They experienced nothing out of the ordinary and couldn't believe what all the fuss was about. They hated the tourists and found them to be more of a pest than any ghost or demon. They took out a law suit against the Lutzes and the publishers, the case was settled out of court.
 An attorney, William Weber (who was actually Ronald DeFeo's defense lawyer) jumped in on the scene. He was also suing the Lutzes for stealing his ideas for the Amityville story. His case was also settled out of court. The judge even stated that with all the discrepancies and exaggerations in the story that the book was a lot of nonsense.

The real truth was eventually uncovered................

The Lutzes were apparently unhappy about living in a house after all those murders had been committed. They decided to abandon it and go live with a relative for a while to think about their situation. The relative suggested to them that they could expand on their "bad feelings" and make it into a really good ghost story.
 The Lutzes then met with William Weber seeking more information about the murders and what went on in the house. William was about to write a book about the murders. He had an idea to add the Lutzes feelings into his book and discussed doing this with them. He showed them pictures and gave them all the information they needed about the crime scene.
 Shortly after this meeting was when the Lutzes first went public with their haunting story. Weber went along with it all at first but got disillusioned with it all when the stories started getting more and more exaggerated, he then backed out of the entire thing.
 Weber still wanted to write his book on the murders but the Lutzes beat him to it with their own book.
 The real Amityville house is still standing. A family is still living in there with no poltergeists or ghosts to complain of. The house was located at 112 Ocean Avenue, Amityville, but the number has been changed. It has been repainted and the windows at the top of the house (the ones that used to glow red) are replaced with different shaped ones. The owners try their best to disguise the house from the tourists, but I suspect nothing will ever stop the tourists from wanting to have a look at the house.

TRIVIA
 The part of the house that is always depicted in photos - the glowing red windows that are portrayed as evil eyes is actually the side of the house, it's not actually the front of the house. The house was built on the land sideways so you see the side from the street.
 There was a story going around during the filming of The Amityville Horror about the production team being too scared to work in the real Amityville house and so they had to use a house in Tom's River, New Jersey instead. The real reason was that the town of Amityville refused the film company to use the house due to the incredible circus that was being created. The family who lived in the real house once again started suing. They sued the production company because shots of the real house were used in some of the film's trailers.
 The rejected score for The Exorcist was used for the film The Amityville Horror.

© 2005 Castle of Spirits - All Rights Reserved


 

 
 



Last edited by MrEd45, 22/4/2005, 17:21


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" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
22/4/2005, 17:19 Link to this post Send Email to MrEd45   Send PM to MrEd45 Blog
 
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It all started in November of 1973, when twenty-three Ronald DeFeo, while high on heroin, shot and killed his four siblings and both of his parents. DeFeo was tried, convicted and sentenced to six life sentences for the crime.
 The following year, 1974, again in November, George and Kathy Lutz purchased the DeFeo house, a six bedroom Colonial with a swimming pool and its own boathouse, located in the Long Island community of Amityville. The purchase price was reportedly eighty-thousand dollars. On December 12th, the Lutzs and their children moved into the house. A month later, on January 13, 1975; they moved out, supposedly in fear for their lives.
 According to the Lutzs, they were driven from the house by supernatural forces, which began to occur the day they moved in. On that day, a family friend, Father Frank Mancuso, dropped by to bless the house. During the benediction, a booming male voice was heard, ordering them to "Get Out!". Over the nest few weeks, a string of strange occurrences followed. The Lutzs youngest child encountered, in her bedroom, a pig with "glowing red eyes." A heavy door was mysteriously torn from its hinges. George Lutz saw his wife, Kathy, levitating above their bed, and on another occasion, Lutz heard band music while in the living room and went to investigate. Failing to find the source, he returned to find the living room rug rolled up and the furniture moved around the room. Finally, during a torrential rainstorm, with winds of "hurricane strength", and the electrical power out, the Lutzs fled the house, leaving their belongings behind.
 Approximately a year afterwards, author Jay Anson heard of the events in Amityville, and contacted the Lutz family. he was given exclusive rights to the story in exchange for an even split of the royalties. Anson's retelling of the story, "The Amityville Horror", became a best seller in both hardcover and paperback, was made into a highly successful movie, and a later somewhat less sucessful sequel. The Lutzs month of terror had made they and Anson relatively wealthy.
 But then the bubble started to burst. It turned out that Anson had developed the story not from personal interviews with the Lutzs, but from forty-five hours of previously taped interviews provided to him by George Lutz. Lutz had also been talking with William Weber, an attorney representing none other than Ronald DeFeo. Defeo, having failed at an insanity plea, was trying to get a new trial through a "the devil made me do it" ploy, claiming the same supernatural forces that had tormented the Lutzs had forced him to commit his crime. (He failed.) Neither was Jay Anson the first writer Lutz had been in contact with.
 Before Anson had ever heard of the Lutzs, they had struck a tenative deal with author Paul Hoffman to tell their story, but the deal had eventually fell through, resulting in the Lutzs taking Hoffman to court. This was a big mistake on their part. Under oath, George Lutz admitted that the incidents involving the band music and the rolled up rug and moving living room furniture and the door being ripped from its hinges had never happened. Nor had a supernatural voice ordered them from the house the day of its blessing. Indeed the house had never been "formally" blessed at all, not by Father Mancuso or any other priest. Lutz further stated that he "may have been only dreaming" when he saw his wife levitating above their bed. And no, he had never seen a pig, red-eyed or otherwise in his daughthers room. As for the "hurricane strength" rainstorm that knocked out power the day the Lutzs fled the house, weather reports that day only indicated "traces" of preciptation, with no reported power outages.
 The whole thing was obviously a hoax or scam, but the question remains: Why?
 The truth was never revealed. However certain information, which came to light later allows some educated guesses to be made. Although the house was fairly priced at eighty-thousand dollars, "People Magazine" found out that the Lutzs had only budgeted forty-thousand for their home purchase. Further, when they abandoned the house, the furniture they left behind was described as "cheap knock off". With these facts, it is easy to assume that the simplest solution is the correct one: money. The Lutzs had apparently gotten in over their head and this was the only solution they could find that to salvage something from impending financial disaster.
 Within a year, the house had new owners, James and Barbara Cromarty and their children. "The book is completely untrue" Barbara told "People Magazine", "this is a lovely home." None of the Cromartys have ever seen or experienced any supernatural occurences. The only problems they have had have been from people wanting to see "The Amityville Horror."
   

Written by Wayne McDowell - © 2002 Pagewise


Last edited by MrEd45, 22/4/2005, 17:26


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" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
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Here is a website that has some of the details of the alledged case.

http://www.amityvillehorrortruth.com/

I read the book a couple of years after it came out. It really played with my imagination, but I was in my teens then.

I think the only true hauntings in this case was from all the lawyers and lawsuits.
23/4/2005, 15:19 Link to this post Send Email to Diostillrocks   Send PM to Diostillrocks
 
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Another source of information on the whole thing:

http://www.snopes.com/horrors/ghosts/amityville.asp

Comming from this generally HIGHLY interesting site:

http://www.snopes.com/
25/4/2005, 1:22 Link to this post  
 
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quote:

Rahul wrote:

quote:

JohnH wrote:

Down the street from here is where 90 died in a Cerritos plane crash....I drive home through there late at night from gigs, scary as all hell. All the homes are occupied also. That's sick.

John



People have probably died at some point or another, on almost every patch we live in. I bet someone has died in my house over the years, or on the land on which it was built.

So if the death is more publicised, does that make it more sick to live there? Or is it just better not to know who died on your patch?



Good point there. It's better not to know. But in the place of a plane crash or massacre John H will not be living there. I guess I'm just too sensitive. I wish I hadn't seen the non graphic picture last year of what was on the street I drive down (which is where some of the debris went, adjacent to the crash site)...It wouldn't have been as spooky to me as it is now.

John

25/4/2005, 10:46 Link to this post Send Email to JohnH   Send PM to JohnH
 
Milan Fahrnholz Profile
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Registered: 09-2003
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Re: The Amityville Horror.


In the house I spent the first 2 1/2 - 2 3/4 years of my life a crime scene had taken place before in the kitchen and obviously the then houseowner hung himself above the kitchen table(the place I would sit and play with my lego system stuff in my early days). Obviously my parents felt quite uncomfortable about this(needless to say I didn´t know about that at the time).

Sometimes it´s better just not to know.
25/4/2005, 11:09 Link to this post  
 


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