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Ormandy Profile
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posticon How would these bands go down in history?


How would these bands go down in history if they had different names.

MKI:
If they had gone with the name “Roundabout” and made those three albums and of course the hit song “Hush”, would they’d be nothing more than a foot note in the pages of Rock history or a one hit wonder. Maybe something would be written about them like, “Roundabout” reformed as the legendary band Deep Purple (1969 - 1973).

MKII:
If this lineup a.k.a. DEEP PURPLE, recorded the albums “Concerto For Group And Orchestra”, “In Rock”, “Fireball”, “Machine Head”, “Made In Japan” and “Who Do We Think We Are” and then disbanded after the Japan tour of 1973. How would they be remembered if they didn’t reform?

But of course they did reunite in ‘84 and made three more studio albums “Perfect Strangers”, “House Of Blue Light” and “The Battle Rages On”. How would they be remembered if they did reform?

MKIII/IV:
If Blackmore, Lord and Paice started a new group a.k.a. BURN with new members Glen Hughes and David Coverdale, how would they go down in history? With just three studio albums “Burn”, “Stormbringer” and “Come Taste The Band” and one lineup change (Bolin replaces Blackmore on guitar). Would this band get more admiration under a different name or would they simply be another foot note in pages of Rock history?

MK V?:
Joe Lynn Turner wants to make another “Rainbow” album so Jon Lord and Ian Paice join former members for a reunion album. I bet “Slaves and Masters” would be better received as a Rainbow reunion.

MKVII/VIII:
What if Deep Purple had disbanded after Blackmore quit, and Lord, Gillan, Glover and Paice decided to start a new group with Steve Morse on guitar called THE AVIATORS (1995- ). With three studio albums “Purpendicular”, “Abandon” and “Bananas” and one on the way. Would this band get more attention or more respect with a different name?

Last edited by Ormandy, 3/7/2005, 21:05
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MrEd45 Profile
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


quote:

Ormandy wrote:

How would these bands go down in history if they had different names.

MKI:

a) If they had gone with the name “Roundabout” and made those three albums and of course the hit song “Hush”, would they’d be nothing more than a foot note in the pages of Rock history or a one hit wonder

b) Maybe something would be written about them like, “Roundabout” reformed as the legendary band Deep Purple (1969 - 1973).





 Interesting conceptual question, Ormandy! emoticon
 First, it's fascinating to remember that MkI did do their first recordings + their first tour dates (albeit a pretty short tour! ) as "Roundabout". To be honest, I don't think I've ever really contemplated things from the angle you've introduced here...
 Another facet to your jewel of an angle are the other band names that were under consideration. I believe some were under consideration from the beginning, i.e. after the disappearance of Chris Curtis, and others were suggested after the band's return of that initial Scandinavian tour. Here's a list I can remember: "Orpheus', "Sugarlump", "Concrete God" + "Fire". Hmmm...I sense a "What If" type of poll in that last bit! emoticon

a) I suppose if all the musicians involved hadn't moved on to scale greater musical heights due to some sort of natural or unnatural type of attrition - retirement, death/physical handicap, forced to get a haircut and get a real job emoticon / emoticon , abducted by aliens/extraterrestrials emoticon (don't laugh, there's at least one lead singer of a 60s band {The Troggs? } who either makes this claim or heads up some fringe organization that believes alien abductions happen and are fairly frequent),etc.,etc - then it's well within the realm of possibility that indeed, "Roundabout" could very well have wound up being remembered or thought of as "...nothing more than a foot note in the pages of Rock history or a one hit wonder."
  Personally, they'd still have held a place in my heart + mind as an excellent band (I've been a DP fan since spring/early summer of 1969) that unfortunately only made 3 studio albums - and I must add that, as a whole, those 3 studio albums are paramount examples of the style of music (hard, melodic, daring-at-times + experimental; all played with a virtuosity that
's hard to match) that was soon to become even more refined + polished until it would sweep the world through the early-to-mid 70s. That 'sweeping' may well have been accomplished by bands other than what became Deep Purple MkII, but whomever would've filled DPMkII's particular slot in rock music history would probably have been influenced/inspired by those 3 "Roundabout" albums, similar to "Roundabout" being influenced by (among others) - Vanilla Fudge.
 It's funny (for lack of a better word, as it's not really 'funny' at all emoticon ) that by far too many writers and music fans, Deep Purple as an entire entity, individual Mks notwithstanding, are currently regarded as "...nothing more than a foot note in the pages of Rock history or a one hit wonder."

b) If this parallel/alternative/revisionist/theoreticalwhatever history we're discussing here had assumed at least the similar turn of keeping Blackmore, Lord + Paice together and recruiting if not exactly Ian Gillan + Roger Glover, then musicians of equal talent (now that's far, far easier to type than to actually accomplish! Maybe especially circa 1969! ) then there's little doubt in my mind that what you suggest would likely have been the case.

Last edited by MrEd45, 4/7/2005, 0:35


---
" Those who can - do. Those who can't do - teach. Those who can't do or teach - administrate."
- Anon.

" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


quote:

Ormandy wrote:

MKII:

a) If this lineup a.k.a. DEEP PURPLE, recorded the albums “Concerto For Group And Orchestra”, “In Rock”, “Fireball”, “Machine Head”, “Made In Japan” and “Who Do We Think We Are” and then disbanded after the Japan tour of 1973. How would they be remembered if they didn’t reform?

b) But of course they did reunite in ‘84 and made three more studio albums “Perfect Strangers”, “House Of Blue Light” and “The Battle Rages On”. How would they be remembered if they did reform?





a) For me personally, they'd be remembered/thought of exactly as I do remember them. As The Greatest Rock Group In Rock Music History .
   As for the rest of the of the rock music fans in general, Deep Purple fans in particular, and the rock media, I also think they'd be remembered/thought of as they currently are remembered/thought of. Though perhaps there'd be some sort of difference to some if not for the 1984 reunion.

b) Refer to the first paragraph in a) above for my answer. emoticon
  I realize that for some people - the few, the hopelessly misguided emoticon - the overall effect of the reunion somehow served to tarnish the reputation of Deep Purple MkII, circa 1969-1973. If that's their opinion, that's fine - I just thoroughly disagree with it. emoticon

---
" Those who can - do. Those who can't do - teach. Those who can't do or teach - administrate."
- Anon.

" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


quote:

Ormandy wrote:

MKIII/IV:

a) If Blackmore, Lord and Paice started a new group a.k.a. BURN with new members Glen Hughes and David Coverdale, how would they go down in history? With just three studio albums “Burn”, “Stormbringer” and “Come Taste The Band” and one lineup change (Bolin replaces Blackmore on guitar).

b) Would this band get more admiration under a different name

c)...or would they simply be another foot note in pages of Rock history?





a) I think they'd've gone down pretty much the same way as they actually did and do. I say "pretty much" and that little bit of doubt is because if the music's exactly the same, the only really different factor is the name change in the band. MkIII just would've been quicker to claim the dubious honor of being officially dubbed the first "Purple Offshoot Band" 3 years before it was bestowed upon Rainbow MkII's heads. Now as for the MkIV part of this, see

b) I truly think that MkIV would've been far better received at the time by - at least - the "hardcore" of Deep Purple fans had they gone along with what was reportedly suggested/discussed at the time amongst the band - a name change from Deep Purple.
  I myself have experienced a near 180 degree change in direction (for the better, or to a more positive opinion) regarding my opinion of "Come Taste The Band". Would that 180 degree change have happened sooner had the album been released in 1975/1976 under a different band name? emoticon I think so...yes. emoticon Even if the change in my opinion had still taken close to 30 years, I'm certain that the intensity of my dislike for the tracks I didn't - and still don't and probably never will - like would've been to a lesser degree in 1976 had the album been recorded + released under a different band name in 1976. The changing of the guitarist in 1976 was monumental and would be today under similar circumstances. It would still mark the first change in the 'base' of the band - the trio of Blackmore, Lord + Paice; the remaining 3 'originals' - since the start in 1968, no matter what name they'd been recording/performing under. It also marked a dramatic change in style and direction, even more so than the change(s) explored on "Stormbringer" .
  All that said, let me hasten to add that I've never thought of the album as anything but a Deep Purple album, albeit a definitely "different" sort of Deep Purple album...which is something I still can't 100% state about another album that was to be released under the name "Deep Purple" close to a decade-and-a-half later. emoticon We'll get to that one in a little while... emoticon

c) See all my previous posts for thoughts on this regarding all the Mks of Deep Purple.

---
" Those who can - do. Those who can't do - teach. Those who can't do or teach - administrate."
- Anon.

" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


quote:

MrEd45 wrote:

quote:

Ormandy wrote:

MKIII/IV:

a) If Blackmore, Lord and Paice started a new group a.k.a. BURN with new members Glen Hughes and David Coverdale, how would they go down in history? With just three studio albums “Burn”, “Stormbringer” and “Come Taste The Band” and one lineup change (Bolin replaces Blackmore on guitar).

b) Would this band get more admiration under a different name

c)...or would they simply be another foot note in pages of Rock history?





a) I think they'd've gone down pretty much the same way as they actually did and do. I say "pretty much" and that little bit of doubt is because if the music's exactly the same, the only really different factor is the name change in the band. MkIII just would've been quicker to claim the dubious honor of being officially dubbed the first "Purple Offshoot Band" 3 years before it was bestowed upon Rainbow MkII's heads. Now as for the MkIV part of this, see

b) I truly think that MkIV would've been far better received at the time by - at least - the "hardcore" of Deep Purple fans had they gone along with what was reportedly suggested/discussed at the time amongst the band - a name change from Deep Purple.
  I myself have experienced a near 180 degree change in direction (for the better, or to a more positive opinion) regarding my opinion of "Come Taste The Band". Would that 180 degree change have happened sooner had the album been released in 1975/1976 under a different band name? emoticon I think so...yes. emoticon Even if the change in my opinion had still taken close to 30 years, I'm certain that the intensity of my dislike for the tracks I didn't - and still don't and probably never will - like would've been to a lesser degree in 1976 had the album been recorded + released under a different band name in 1976. The changing of the guitarist in 1976 was monumental and would be today under similar circumstances. It would still mark the first change in the 'base' of the band - the trio of Blackmore, Lord + Paice; the remaining 3 'originals' - since the start in 1968, no matter what name they'd been recording/performing under. It also marked a dramatic change in style and direction, even more so than the change(s) explored on "Stormbringer" .
  All that said, let me hasten to add that I've never thought of the album as anything but a Deep Purple album, albeit a definitely "different" sort of Deep Purple album...which is something I still can't 100% state about another album that was to be released under the name "Deep Purple" close to a decade-and-a-half later. emoticon We'll get to that one in a little while... emoticon

c) See all my previous posts for thoughts on this regarding all the Mks of Deep Purple.



Tommy mentioned in some writing of the time that Purple had a formula,and implied that all the ideas were sort of filtered through that formula(my words,not his,although that was the implication).Had they not had the Purple name as a burden,they might have had a chance.I think for the musicians,too,they might have felt more comfortable building a new ship instead of keeping a sinking ship afloat.Purple had a sound and with Bolin there was no way to maintain it,he just wasn't the type of player Ritchie was,if anyone has ever been.Same as today,the band is much more effective when they play their own material than the old stuff.

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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


quote:

Ormandy wrote:

MK V:
a) Joe Lynn Turner wants to make another “Rainbow” album...

b)...so Jon Lord and Ian Paice join former members for a reunion album.

c) I bet “Slaves and Masters” would be better received as a Rainbow reunion.






a) Okay...so what else is new? emoticon Sorry, that was just too good a straight line to let go by! emoticon

b) That's been pretty much my impression(s) of "Slaves + Masters" since I first heard it...that Jon Lord + Ian Paice had been hired as, respectively, the keyboardist + drummer for the latest Rainbow reunion.

c) That's been pretty much how in my heart I've always viewed "Slaves + Masters". Intellectually, I'm quite aware and accept that the album is, in fact, a Deep Purple album. Emotionally, I consider it a Rainbow reunion album...that suffers in comparison - as most all other rock music does, no matter who recorded it - to "Rising"; "Long Live Rock 'n Roll" + "Down To Earth".
 emoticon I forgot to address part of this...I would back your bet that "Slaves + Masters" would've been better received as a Rainbow reunion album, particularly by others of my mind-set/age/etc.,etc. For people of a later 'generation', the album probably would've gone over very well as a Rainbow reunion. But for me and doubtless others, it'd still suffer a bit as the only 'real' Rainbow reunion we'd've beeen likely to accept unquestioningly circa 1989/90/91 would've had to have included - at the least - Ronnie Dio ,and preferably Cozy Powell along with Blackmore.

Last edited by MrEd45, 4/7/2005, 19:36


---
" Those who can - do. Those who can't do - teach. Those who can't do or teach - administrate."
- Anon.

" One that will not reason is a bigot. One that cannot reason is an ignoramus. One that dares not reason is a slave." - Anon
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


quote:

MrEd45 wrote:

quote:

Ormandy wrote:

MK V:
a) Joe Lynn Turner wants to make another “Rainbow” album...

b)...so Jon Lord and Ian Paice join former members for a reunion album.

c) I bet “Slaves and Masters” would be better received as a Rainbow reunion.






a) Okay...so what else is new? emoticon Sorry, that was just too good a straight line to let go by! emoticon

b) That's been pretty much my impression(s) of "Slaves + Masters" since I first heard it...that Jon Lord + Ian Paice had been hired as, respectively, the keyboardist + drummer for the latest Rainbow reunion.

c) That's been pretty much how in my heart I've always viewed "Slaves + Masters". Intellectually, I'm quite aware and accept that the album is, in fact, a Deep Purple album. Emotionally, I consider it a Rainbow reunion album...that suffers in comparison - as most all other rock music does, no matter who recorded it - to "Rising"; "Long Live Rock 'n Roll" + "Down To Earth".
 emoticon I forgot to address part of this...I would back your bet that "Slaves + Masters" would've been better received as a Rainbow reunion album, particularly by others of my mind-set/age/etc.,etc. For people of a later 'generation', the album probably would've gone over very well as a Rainbow reunion. But for me and doubtless others, it'd still suffer a bit as the only 'real' Rainbow reunion we'd've beeen likely to accept unquestioningly circa 1989/90/91 would've had to have included - at the least - Ronnie Dio ,and preferably Cozy Powell along with Blackmore.




Accept that the Rainbow albums with Joe were miles ahead better than S&M,at least to myself.The problem with S&M is it isn't very good overall.DTC and BOOS hold up a bit better to me personally,with overall better tunes.
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


The reason I came up with this topic was, a few years back I was becoming a MKII snob and anything that wasn’t the “classic” lineup, I was on the verge of selling. That’s when I thought about listening to the other versions of Deep Purple one more time, with the attitude that it was a different band. For me, it kind of took the pressure off the other lineups.

So, MKI became Roundabout and MK III became the “Coverdale/Hughes” Band, etc. Just to see how these lineups stood on their own. Well, to make a long story…end, I’m KEEPING all my DP CD’s because they do kick butt. For example, MK I albums are as enjoyable and definitely more consistent than any Cream or Hendrix album.

Deep Purple fans are so lucky to have a band so rich in musical variety…let us celebrate!
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Re: How would these bands go down in history?


"MKII:
If this lineup a.k.a. DEEP PURPLE, recorded the albums “Concerto For Group And Orchestra”, “In Rock”, “Fireball”, “Machine Head”, “Made In Japan” and “Who Do We Think We Are” and then disbanded after the Japan tour of 1973. How would they be remembered if they didn’t reform?"


Probably in much, much higher regard than they hold now. A classic band calling it a day rather than trudging on with line-ups and albums of a questionable merit - not that some weren't good.

---
'Led Zeppelin taught us that heavy wasn't about playing loud, heavy was an attitude.' Roger Glover
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